Slavery and Indenture

Slavery, as it is practiced in Zahar, Zanzibar, the Ivory Kingdoms, and the Kingdoms of Jutland, does not legally exist within the Thracian Empire. However, foreign nobles mock the Thracian pretension that “there is no slavery in Thrace”, because lifelong indentured servitude is widespread and fulfills a similar economic and cultural role.

Indenturing is the process of selling oneself into servitude, and indenture is the state of being a servant. At any time, any man or woman may sell themselves into indenture; the proceeds of the sale may be assigned to the indentured servant’s spouse, parents, or children, to the satisfaction of his creditors, or otherwise as the indenture agreement dictates. Indenture is generally for 1 year, 7 years, or 21 years, though in principle any term may be devised. Lifelong indenture is imposed by the state on violent criminals, with eternal indenture (which gives the master and his heirs the right to the servant’s services as a spirit after death) reserved for heretics and traitors.

Slavery and Indenture

Stamus Contra Malum: 1013 YE koreankodiak koreankodiak